David Plowden’s Iowa

Coming to Iowa’s Blanden Memorial Art Museum is a photographic exhibit by David Plowden who is considered one of America’s best known documentary photographers. His images are held in private collections as well as many museums. His images have also graced the pages of 21 published books and many leading periodicals. David Plowden has been visiting Iowa for over fifty years photographing its landscape and architecture.

David Plowden Image

David Plowden Image

How many of us can say that we have even paid attention to our surroundings for even a fraction of that time. When was the last time you took a camera and walked around your own town taking photographs of its architecture? Now, you all probably thinking there is nothing unique or magical about where I live but I’ll bet if you really look you might be surprised. So, take the challenge and do it.

As for David Plowden’s photographs they will be on display at the Blanden Memorial Art Museum in Fort Dodge, Iowa.

August 30, 2014—December 31, 2014

David Plowden’s Iowa

A traveling exhibition sponsored by Humanities Iowa

“Humanities Iowa is proud to announce the release of David Plowden’s Iowa; a capstone collection of Iowa photography from an American master. Proclaimed “an American treasure” by historian David McCullough, David Plowden has produced 20 books of photos and won many prestigious awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1967. His latest collection is curated from over four decades photographing our state, and offers a view of Iowa that is nostalgic yet timeless. David Plowden’s Iowa contains over 70 pages of photographs, along with an introductory essay by Rima Girnius, PhD, that masterfully interprets Plowden’s Iowa photos and places them firmly within the context of his illustrious career. This book also includes a short biography as well as a conversation with Plowden about his work.”*

David Plowden Image

David Plowden Image

Since December 2011 a traveling exhibition of photographs from David Plowden’s Iowa has been on display throughout the state. “ In this exhibition, Plowden’s photographs entice the viewer to get a “sense of” what life was, or still is, like in rural Iowa. He does not define Iowa or its inhabitants for his audience; instead, Plowden’s photographs rely on the viewer’s interpretation.”* David Plowden’s photographs are on display at the following venues through 2014.

Posted in Awendan Thoughts, Uncategorized |

National Library of Medicine

This web site, Awendan, is about creativity in the arts. Most of the articles featured here are a direct reflection on painting, theater, or literature. This article takes a slightly different view of that creativity. We will take a look at how these creative talents are used in medicine to inform and educate the uninformed.

World-War-1

World-War-1

There is a library, National Library of Medicine, full of great literature, images, and motion pictures about medicine that provides information on a wide variety of subjects and in a variety of languages. This library is the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the information is housed in their Digital Collections, which is available for free.

Public-Health

Public-Health

The Collections cover such subjects as ‘Medicine in the Americas, 1610-1920′, ‘Cholera Online, 1817 to 1900′, World War 1, 1914-1918′, ‘Tropical Disease Motion Pictures, and ‘The Public Health Film Goes to War’. There are over 12,000 items in these collections.

Also, these items are available in many languages; most are in English; however they do include Spanish, Portuguese, German, French, Latin and even one in Ancient Greek.

Viaticus

Viaticus

If you are interested in Therapeutic Oils then you need to take a look at “Viaticus” by Constantine, the African. The publication date is between 1200-1299. However, before you do you will probably have to learn Latin.

The web site offers a large variety of information both historical and current that can be and is valuable to anyone that wants to visit the National Library of Medicine.

Digital Collections is the National Library of Medicine’s free online archive of biomedical books and videos. All of the content in Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. Digital Collections provides unique access to NLM’s rich, historical resources.

Posted in Libraries |

Rebels With a Cause

Rebels With a Cause: American Impressionist Women from the Huntsville Museum of Art

Is an exhibit that is in’s final week of showing at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel, Mississippi.

“Rebels With a Cause features 55 works by female artists from the Sellars Collection that exemplify the strong effect that French Impressionism had on late 19th century American art. In this exhibition are paintings and works on paper that embody the early influence of French Impressionism and its precursor, the Barbizon style.

The exhibition showcases works that adopt the various hallmarks of what became known as the American Impressionist style, branching out beyond the strict definitions of Impressionism and incorporating other modern movements and more individual artistic approaches. The female artists in the show were active between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries. Many rebelled against the convention of their day by exhibiting alongside their male counterparts, receiving awards, and pioneering the way for those who would follow. Today’s art historians are rediscovering these women and reestablishing their rightful place in the expanding narrative of American art.

The emphasis on female painters distinguishes Rebels With a Cause from other art exhibitions. The works are on loan from The Sellars Collection of art by American women at the Hunstville Museum of Art, one of the finest collections in the South of work by female artists.

The artists featured in the exhibition including Mississippian Marie Hull, were active during the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries. Works in the show include landscapes, still life paintings, genre scenes, and portraits. The subject matter and the time frame in which the works were created make them a perfect complement to the paintings in the LRMA American Collection.”

Posted in Uncategorized |